The color green from a Sprite can from the 90’s nestles against stripes of green from the Christmas tree that stayed up until my early February birthday in 2001. The stripes are confronted by a conical growth, rising from a cushiony plane of the kind of yellow ochre that makes me a little nauseous, and looks like aged egg crates from my attic. A cakey, matte orange mess of paint perches on top of a wobbling, pale body overcome by scraped triangles and swampy green Birkenstocks that sink into a circus tent platform in the middle of a dimly lit room. A girl in a baseball cap whispers to him from behind, but it won’t last long because the corrosive, deep magenta is suctioning her down through the floor boards. A glittery river swallows up a living room where VHS cassette tapes line the wall, grouted with neon pink foam that caresses the tops of the window sills where the vertical blinds remind me that I’m still in Florida. The two figures’ noses dip down, forgetting where their faces go. Egg whites stained pink float on the top of the murky fuchsia swimming pool where an apprehensive female emerges from the fence or the bushes behind her. Sickly sea foam lawn chairs try to talk her out of it, while my matching green feet wade through the yolks in the water.  As an artist, I intend to use paint to see my surroundings more clearly. The subject matter I am expressing acts as a mirror of our environments of which I am carving out visual moments. Portrayed in fields of loud color, vessels, vegetation, and the human body, repeatedly appear in the works. I conceive of their interiority as inaccessible to the viewer and place them on coffee tables, bathroom floor tiles, windowsills, toilet seats, and pool patios. My work is concerned with human’s theoretical and physical relationships to objects, and I use paint to explore imagery consisting of different still life, interior settings, and figurative motifs. The characters are more often than not situated in domestic scenery coated in imperfect patterns and pools of color. With the collection of these subjects, I pose a dialogue between them, and ask the viewer to consider their role as a physical object in the universe. 

The color green from a Sprite can from the 90’s nestles against stripes of green from the Christmas tree that stayed up until my early February birthday in 2001. The stripes are confronted by a conical growth, rising from a cushiony plane of the kind of yellow ochre that makes me a little nauseous, and looks like aged egg crates from my attic. A cakey, matte orange mess of paint perches on top of a wobbling, pale body overcome by scraped triangles and swampy green Birkenstocks that sink into a circus tent platform in the middle of a dimly lit room. A girl in a baseball cap whispers to him from behind, but it won’t last long because the corrosive, deep magenta is suctioning her down through the floor boards. A glittery river swallows up a living room where VHS cassette tapes line the wall, grouted with neon pink foam that caresses the tops of the window sills where the vertical blinds remind me that I’m still in Florida. The two figures’ noses dip down, forgetting where their faces go. Egg whites stained pink float on the top of the murky fuchsia swimming pool where an apprehensive female emerges from the fence or the bushes behind her. Sickly sea foam lawn chairs try to talk her out of it, while my matching green feet wade through the yolks in the water. 

As an artist, I intend to use paint to see my surroundings more clearly. The subject matter I am expressing acts as a mirror of our environments of which I am carving out visual moments. Portrayed in fields of loud color, vessels, vegetation, and the human body, repeatedly appear in the works. I conceive of their interiority as inaccessible to the viewer and place them on coffee tables, bathroom floor tiles, windowsills, toilet seats, and pool patios. My work is concerned with human’s theoretical and physical relationships to objects, and I use paint to explore imagery consisting of different still life, interior settings, and figurative motifs. The characters are more often than not situated in domestic scenery coated in imperfect patterns and pools of color. With the collection of these subjects, I pose a dialogue between them, and ask the viewer to consider their role as a physical object in the universe.