Kinder paints interior settings where rivers disrupt living rooms, human hands drip and spill into sitting chairs, baseball caps rest on diamond patterns, floors curl up to meet crooked walls, vertical blinds are caked onto stages, and patterns of roses and curls scatter between visual planes. Often, plants find their way inside and couches turn into humans. The work depicts table legs sprouting from the tops of coffee cups, wobbling bed frames, pianos, lamps, mattresses spilling out of windows, plants, human figures dripping out of chairs, and telescopes. The figures are painted against fields of patterns of flowers, stripes, polka dots, and eggs that float and weave their way through the images. Patterns crawl around bed sheets and swim across dining room tables.  Philosophical influence Graham Harman’s study of object oriented ontologies allows the viewer to more critically engage with the objects in the work. In his book, The Quadruple Effect, he discusses the experiences of objects and humans, and acknowledges our limited conscious perception--  “No matter how hard I work to become conscious of things, environing conditions still remain of which I never become fully aware.”  In many ways, there is a kinship between Kinder's paintings to this limited conscious experience of moments and objects as Harmon explores. The level of rendering, color exaggerations, and shapes that are unsure of themselves reflect this limited visual perception of reality. 

Kinder paints interior settings where rivers disrupt living rooms, human hands drip and spill into sitting chairs, baseball caps rest on diamond patterns, floors curl up to meet crooked walls, vertical blinds are caked onto stages, and patterns of roses and curls scatter between visual planes. Often, plants find their way inside and couches turn into humans. The work depicts table legs sprouting from the tops of coffee cups, wobbling bed frames, pianos, lamps, mattresses spilling out of windows, plants, human figures dripping out of chairs, and telescopes. The figures are painted against fields of patterns of flowers, stripes, polka dots, and eggs that float and weave their way through the images. Patterns crawl around bed sheets and swim across dining room tables. 

Philosophical influence Graham Harman’s study of object oriented ontologies allows the viewer to more critically engage with the objects in the work. In his book, The Quadruple Effect, he discusses the experiences of objects and humans, and acknowledges our limited conscious perception-- 

“No matter how hard I work to become conscious of things, environing conditions still remain of which I never become fully aware.” 

In many ways, there is a kinship between Kinder's paintings to this limited conscious experience of moments and objects as Harmon explores. The level of rendering, color exaggerations, and shapes that are unsure of themselves reflect this limited visual perception of reality.